Thornhill - Toronto & Thornhill Luxury Real Estate: Full Service Real Estate Michael Switzer Real Estate

Thornhill is located on the northern border of the city of Toronto. Once a municipal village, Thornhill is now a community and postal designation geographically split into two municipalities along Yonge Street, the city of Vaughan to the west and the city of Markham to the east with a popluation of 106,000. Richmond Hill.

Originally centred on Yonge between Centre Street and John Street, the boundaries of the community are now generally considered to be Dufferin Street to the west, Highway 7 to the north, Steeles Avenue to the south, and Highway 404 to the east. Like most of the urbanized for Greater Toronto Area villages outside of the City of Toronto, such as Woodbridge, Maple and Unionville, Thornhill has retained postal designation for addresses within the former village’s boundaries, and local newspapers, sports teams, and schools continue to operate under the Thornhill name.

Upper Thornhill Estates

Upper Thornhill estates is located in one of the most sought after locations in the City of Vaughan. The community is nestled amongst acres of protected valley lands, pine forests with winding creeks and trails giving all residents a tranquil and natural setting.

Located on the west side of Bathurst, just two kilometers north of Major Mackenzie Drive, Upper Thornhill Estates is close to a wide variety of world class amenities such as the acclaimed Eagles Nest Golf Course, York Central Hospital and Upper Thornhill Medical Centre to name just a few.


History

Thornhill was founded in 1794. Its first settlers on Yonge Street in Thornhill were Asa Johnson (who settled on the Vaughan side) and Nicholas Miller (who settled on the Markham side). Of particular importance was the arrival of Benjamin Thorne in 1820, who was operating a gristmill, a sawmill, and a tannery in the community. The settlement came to be known as Thorne's Mills, and later, Thorne's Hill, from which its current name is derived. (Thorne committed suicide in 1848, after a serious wheat market crash.)

Between 1830 and 1848, Thornhill experienced a period of continued growth and prosperity. The business district of Thornhill developed on its portion of Yonge Street, between Centre Street and John Street. Stagecoaches travelled between Holland Landing (Lake Simcoe) and York (Toronto) as Yonge Street's road conditions improved with new stonework. During this prosperous period, several churches, many of which are still standing today, were constructed.

Thornhill's location along Yonge Street, a major transportation route, proved to be beneficial to the community's growth throughout much of the twentieth century. The implementation of an electric street railway along Yonge Street in 1898 towards Kleinburg, Georgina, King and Toronto meant that, for the first time, it was possible for people to reside in Thornhill and work in Toronto. By the 1920s, the prevalence of the automobile further facilitated travel along Yonge Street.

20th century

In 1931, Thornhill became a "Police Village"; before that time, Thornhill had no independent status and was split between the townships of Vaughan and Markham along Yonge Street, since the creation of municipal government in 1850. Before 1931, each township administered its own half of the village. The creation of the Police Village gave Thornhill its own political boundaries. The village was headed by a reeve.

In 1971, York Region was created, part of a wave of municipal re-organization which converted many townships into towns and eliminated many of the municipal forms of organization which had existed within those townships. The establishment of a regional administration effectively eliminated the Police Village of Thornhill. Thornhill's administration reverted to the newly formed towns of Markham and Vaughan at this time.

However, many political and social institutions remained organized around the former municipal entities eliminated in 1971. Like neighbouring communities such as Woodbridge, Maple, and Unionville – as is typical for most urbanized former Greater Toronto Area (GTA) villages outside of the City of Toronto – Thornhill remained the postal designation for addresses within the former village's boundaries, and community organizations such as local newspapers, sports teams, and schools continued to operate under the Thornhill name and designation. As an example, until the mid-1990s residents of Thornhill seeking to play high-level hockey were required to play for a Thornhill team.